Multi-platform Project

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Bench Projects

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1. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks”
2. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks”
3. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks”
4. Andrea Brewster, “Beauty Virus”
5. Andrea Brewster, “Beauty Virus”
6. Lori Fischer, “Oakland Through the Windows/Oakland Woman Walking”
7. Lori Fischer, “Rise”
8. Ronnie Sampson, “Three More Roadside Chairs”
9. Ronnie Sampson, “Sign Language: Point of Departure, Sign Language: Please Hold On”
10. Steve Briscoe, “From the History of Everything”
11. Steve Briscoe, “From the History of Everything”
12. Lynn Beldner, “Never Give Up”
13. Lynn Beldner, “Never Give Up and Don’t Think Too Much”
14. Bench Warming Parties

1. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks” - 2015, MLK Jr. Way/between Aileen and Arlington Street

Seyed Alavi’s site-specific installations and public art projects often engage with the poetics of language and space and their power to shape reality. His Bench Marks project consists of a number of posters for the public bus benches that have been created in response to the idea of travelling as a passenger on a bus. Each poster proposes a question that can be read/interpreted either literally in terms of travelling from one spot to another, or metaphorically, in relation to the concept of life as a journey. http://here2day.netwiz.net/

2. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks” - 2015, MLK Jr. Way/between Aileen and Arlington Street

Seyed Alavi’s site-specific installations and public art projects often engage with the poetics of language and space and their power to shape reality. His Bench Marks project consists of a number of posters for the public bus benches that have been created in response to the idea of travelling as a passenger on a bus. Each poster proposes a question that can be read/interpreted either literally in terms of travelling from one spot to another, or metaphorically, in relation to the concept of life as a journey. http://here2day.netwiz.net/

3. Seyed Alavi, “Bench Marks” - 2015, MLK Jr. Way/between Aileen and Arlington Street

Seyed Alavi’s site-specific installations and public art projects often engage with the poetics of language and space and their power to shape reality. His Bench Marks project consists of a number of posters for the public bus benches that have been created in response to the idea of travelling as a passenger on a bus. Each poster proposes a question that can be read/interpreted either literally in terms of travelling from one spot to another, or metaphorically, in relation to the concept of life as a journey. http://here2day.netwiz.net/

4. Andrea Brewster, “Beauty Virus” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/between Aileen and Arlington Street and Shattuck/55th Street

Andrea Brewster’s most recent works are centered within the contemporary art/craft context, while also examining issues of identity, gender, and biomorphic form. Looking at biological processes and forms, Andrea finds the structures of cells and the complexity of proteins endlessly inspiring. For Bench Projects, she created a series of drawings, imagining Beauty as a virus. These Beauty Virus panels ask what if Beauty were contagious and could replicate itself and spread, infecting every one of us, with its magic?

5. Andrea Brewster, “Beauty Virus” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/between Aileen and Arlington Street and Shattuck/55th Street

Andrea Brewster’s most recent works are centered within the contemporary art/craft context, while also examining issues of identity, gender, and biomorphic form. Looking at biological processes and forms, Andrea finds the structures of cells and the complexity of proteins endlessly inspiring. For Bench Projects, she created a series of drawings, imagining Beauty as a virus. These Beauty Virus panels ask what if Beauty were contagious and could replicate itself and spread, infecting every one of us, with its magic?

6. Lori Fischer, “Oakland Through the Windows/Oakland Woman Walking” - 2015, MLK Jr. Way/ Arlington Street.

Lori Fischer is a designer/artist and has lived in the same home in North Oakland for 21 years. She has received several grants through the City of Oakland’s Cultural Arts Funding for work creating hand-sewn dolls and creatures with children in long-term care at local hospitals. Her illustrations are bold, high contrast, simple designs.

7. Lori Fischer, “Rise” – 2015, Shattuck/55th Street

Lori Fischer is a designer/artist and has lived in the same home in North Oakland for 21 years. She has received several grants through the City of Oakland’s Cultural Arts Funding for work creating hand-sewn dolls and creatures with children in long-term care at local hospitals. Her illustrations are bold, high contrast, simple designs.

8. Ronnie Sampson, “Three More Roadside Chairs” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/Aileen Street

Ronnie Sampson is a graphic artist/illustrator/animator/painter/printmaker. He and his wife have their own creative services business in Oakland, CA. For Bench Projects, Ronnie created two bench panels, side-by-side Sign Language: Point of Departure and Sign Language: Please Hold On, intended to suggest different ways we define time, place and direction. Ronnie’s third bench Three More Roadside Chairs is an invitation to sit and think about objects for which aesthetics outlast usefulness.

9. Ronnie Sampson, “Sign Language: Point of Departure, Sign Language: Please Hold On” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/Aileen Street

Ronnie Sampson is a graphic artist/illustrator/animator/painter/printmaker. He and his wife have their own creative services business in Oakland, CA. For Bench Projects, Ronnie created two bench panels, side-by-side Sign Language: Point of Departure and Sign Language: Please Hold On, intended to suggest different ways we define time, place and direction. Ronnie’s third bench Three More Roadside Chairs is an invitation to sit and think about objects for which aesthetics outlast usefulness.

10. Steve Briscoe, “From the History of Everything” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/Aileen Street

For this project Steve Briscoe wanted to extend the vocabulary of his graphic work into public space. On two bus bench panels titled From the History of Everything, 2015.001 and 2015.002 , images of words, DNA, planets, symbols are connected into a pictographic flowchart that begs and yet resists deciphering. http://briscoestudio.com/

11. Steve Briscoe, “From the History of Everything” – 2015, Shattuck/55th Street

For this project Steve Briscoe wanted to extend the vocabulary of his graphic work into public space. On two bus bench panels titled From the History of Everything, 2015.001 and 2015.002 , images of words, DNA, planets, symbols are connected into a pictographic flowchart that begs and yet resists deciphering. http://briscoestudio.com/

12. Lynn Beldner, “Never Give Up” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/Aileen Street

Lynn Beldner describes her creative process like journal writing, but more visual, makingart in response to something that just happened to or around her. For Bench Projects she creates affirmations. These particular affirmations, Never give up and Don’t think too much were in response to neighborhood violence a year ago. Other influences in Lynn’s studio work: potatoes (only russets), handkerchiefs, laundry, laundry lines, pillows, collections, organizing, fossils, anthropology, archeology, biography, and cartography. http://www.lynnbeldner.com/

13. Lynn Beldner, “Never Give Up and Don’t Think Too Much” – 2015, MLK Jr. Way/Aileen Street

Lynn Beldner describes her creative process like journal writing, but more visual, makingart in response to something that just happened to or around her. For Bench Projects she creates affirmations. These particular affirmations, Never give up and Don’t think too much were in response to neighborhood violence a year ago. Other influences in Lynn’s studio work: potatoes (only russets), handkerchiefs, laundry, laundry lines, pillows, collections, organizing, fossils, anthropology, archeology, biography, and cartography. http://www.lynnbeldner.com/

14. Bench Warming Parties

Each time we change the Bench Projects artwork we have a bench warming party, a community gathering at the bus stop celebrating local artists and public art.

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I started Bench Project in 2015 as an artist-led public art platform that rents advertising space at AC Transit bus stops to create ‘bench galleries’ in my North Oakland neighborhood with funding from Southern Exposure’s Alternative Exposure Grant Program. The project commissions Oakland-based artists to create new site-responsive work and encourages community members – including public transit riders, pedestrians, cyclists and drivers – to engage more deeply in their surroundings. Support for Bench Projects is cuurently provided by The City of Oakland Cultural Funding Program, Keep Oakland Beautiful, and The Clorox Company Arts Mini-grant. If you live in North Oakland and are interested in participating, email me at ellen@ellenlake.com

To read more about the project click here.

Bench Projects / Richmond is currently working with NIAD in Richmond, CA. Thanks to California Arts Council Artists Activating Communities for funding this collaboration with NIAD.

 

 

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Friday, June 7th, 2013

Film at 11

01_VideoSurveillance_ELake
02_OJandOutlet_ELake
03_Laundry_ELake
04_Magazine_ELake
05DoorOpening1
05DoorOpening2
05DoorOpening3
06_RedCar_ELake

“24 Hour Video Surveillance” - 2012, 22.5 x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Sunbrite” - 2012, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Cookie Monster on the line” - 2012, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Cut the Clutter - 2012, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Papa Smurf,” - 2012, triptych, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Papa Smurf,” - 2012, triptych, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

“Just a Splice,” - 2012, 22.5 inches x 17 inches, archival digital print

01_VideoSurveillance_ELake thumbnail
02_OJandOutlet_ELake thumbnail
03_Laundry_ELake thumbnail
04_Magazine_ELake thumbnail
05DoorOpening1 thumbnail
05DoorOpening2 thumbnail
05DoorOpening3 thumbnail
06_RedCar_ELake thumbnail

Film at 11 is a multi-platform project combining vintage home movies with digital media today to explore relationships between past/present and the perception of time/memory. This project delves into the evolution of technology and the fluid nature of time and space For a brief period (1939-1942) the diacetate Kodachrome film produced lush color that appears today perfectly preserved, as opposed to triacetate film (post 1942) that does not hold up nearly as well. I’ve been mining 16mm films from that picture-perfect era to use in new work that explores time and technology. This series involves staged interventions that combine contemporary elements with old films and film stills to create digital prints and short animations. This work explores time travel, fusing past and present objects – electronics, furniture, kitchenware – within solitary photographs and within contemporary video, playing with the visual cues we use to establish time and place.


Monday, June 3rd, 2013

Your Favorite Chair/My Favorite Wallpaper

Diptych01_FavoriteChair
Diptych02_ShavingBrush
Diptych03_SaltandPepper
Diptych04_FoundinAttic
Diptych05_TwoHourParking
Diptych06_Catholic

Your Favorite Chair/My Favorite Wallpaper, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

I’ll take that Shaving Brush Home with Me, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

Almost Timeless/Salt and Pepper Shakers, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

Found in the Attic/Wind me Up, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

Two Hour Parking/Just Doesn’t Matter, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

Were you Catholic/I Don’t Think So, 2011, diptych, 5 x 5 inches each, archival digital print

Diptych01_FavoriteChair thumbnail
Diptych02_ShavingBrush thumbnail
Diptych03_SaltandPepper thumbnail
Diptych04_FoundinAttic thumbnail
Diptych05_TwoHourParking thumbnail
Diptych06_Catholic thumbnail

 

In 2011, I went back to Evanston, Illinois to pack up the belongings of my beloved Grandmother, Betty Patterson, who died at 98. This rite of passage, sifting through a person’s home and belongings after they die, is poetic and meaningful with or without a camera. I happened to bring along my camera and here are objects, views, memories, and stories that I noticed and wanted to remember.


Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

String Ball Collector

1. String Ball Collector
2. String Ball Collector
3. String Ball Collector
5. String Balls and String Ball Collector being made in the studio
6. String Balls being made in the studio
7. Emergency Drinking Water, other experiments with motor

1. String Ball Collector, 2002, dimensions variable, steel, aluminium, motor, 9 volt battery, wool, cotton, nylon

2. String Ball Collector, 2002, dimensions variable, steel, aluminium, motor, 9 volt battery, wool, cotton, nylon

3. String Ball Collector, 2002, dimensions variable, steel, aluminium, motor, 9 volt battery, wool, cotton, nylon

5. String Balls and String Ball Collector being made in the studio, Mills College studios, Oakland, CA

6. String Balls being made in the studio, Mills College studios, Oakland, CA

7. Emergency Drinking Water, other experiments with motor, Mills College studios, Oakland, CA

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String Ball Collector, 2002/2005, dimensions variable, steel, aluminium, motor, 9 volt battery, wool, cotton, nylon

The String Ball Collector is a small machine made out of metal that travels in a circle attempting to gather hand wrapped string balls placed in a circle on the floor.  As the machine successfully picks up certain balls, others fall out. Over time, patterns begin to form marking the successes and failures of the machine and charting the path of the String Ball Collector.  Ideas emerge about collecting, obsession, routine, expectation, and disappointment.


Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Sound Goggles

1. Sound Goggles
2. Sound Goggles
3. Sound Goggles
4. Sound Goggles

1. Sound Goggles, 2001 - 2002, 5 x 8 x 4 inches each pair, plastic flashlight glasses, electronics, sound

2. Sound Goggles, 2001 - 2002, 5 x 8 x 4 inches each pair, plastic flashlight glasses, electronics, sound

3. Sound Goggles, 2001 - 2002, 5 x 8 x 4 inches each pair, plastic flashlight glasses, electronics, sound

4. Sound Goggles, 2001 - 2002, 5 x 8 x 4 inches each pair, plastic flashlight glasses, electronics, sound

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Sound Goggles, 2001 – 2002, 5 x 8 x 4 inches each pair, plastic flashlight glasses, electronics, sound

An interactive sound piece.  When the glasses are opened up or worn the lights come on and the sound of a train coming down the tracks begins to play.


All content © Copyright 2017 by Ellen Lake.